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Does belonging to the Commonwealth still have an impact on its member countries

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Par   •  30 Avril 2014  •  332 Mots (2 Pages)  •  2 681 Vues

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m going to talk about the notion spaces and exchanges, to answer the question "Does belonging to the Commonwealth still have an impact on its member countries" ? First, i'll be dealing with the British Empire. Then, i'll be talking about Commonwealth, finally, i'll focus on a case study : Canada.

To beign i'm going to talk about the British Empire : the "ancestor" of the commonwealth. This empire lasted 500 years and dominates the wolrd (imperalism) like a super puissance. There was slavery and power struggles. Queen Victoria is at the head of the empire was based on trade.

Then, i'm going to talk about the british empire to the commonweath. The commonwealth was created in the 1940-1950 after the collapse of the British Empire and the independance of the former colonies. The Commonwealth is an organization of 54 country all over the world. The Commonwealth is an organization of 54 country all over the world, i'ts a mix of different cultures. The Queen is still the head of the empire.

The commonwealth have an impact of on it's citizen's everyday life : There is the financial help, the economic exchanges an...Today Canada is the most multi-cultural country in the world, and the home of immigrants of every ethnic and religious group from every country in the world.

But less than 500 years ago, the only people living in Canada were the Aboriginal people of Canada. "Aboriginal" means the original inhabitants, the people who were here first. The words "Native" or "Indigenous" are also used, and mean the same thing.

Today they all collectively refer to themselves as the First Nations or First Peoples of Canada. However, there are many different cultural groups.

Canada’s first people used at least 53 different languages. Each group referred to themselves by a specific name in their own language.

For instance, the Inuit - colloquially know for years as Eskimos - have always referred to themselves as Inuit - the People. Or in the singular as an Inuk - a person.

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