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Tips to write a good dialogue/conversation

Guide pratique : Tips to write a good dialogue/conversation. Recherche parmi 233 000+ dissertations

Par   •  15 Janvier 2020  •  Guide pratique  •  425 Mots (2 Pages)  •  19 Vues

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Tips to write a good dialogue/conversation

1) Identify the speakers:

how many are they?

- who are they?

- what are their relationships?

- Do they all appear in the text or do we have to invent some of them? 

2) Identifier le niveau de langue :

- identify the language level:

- Formal or familiar situation?

-Although it is an oral language, the level of language may vary depending on the characters and the situation.

 

3) Write an introductory sentence :

- Specify the scene, the context, the participants.

Ex: Betty and John are in love but they had an argument (dispute) last night. John is now trying to convince Betty to get back together.

 

4) Pay attention to the layout:

- No dashes contrary to French.

- All comments are written in quotation marks.

- Go to the line every time there is a new speaker. 

5) Vary introductory verbs:

Affirmation => say, tell, agree, admit, add, announce, declare, explain, insist, offer, remind, warn...

Advice => advise, forbid, order, should

Question => ask, inquire, wonder, want to know

Answer => answer, reply, explain

In a dialogue all these verbs are written in the past simple (preferably)

(See the list below)

6) Enrich your sentences using adverbs as they add nuances to verbs:

- politely, kindly, quietly, shyly, nicely, curiously, frankly, honestly, sincerely...

- angrily, drily, nervously, loudly, rudely, suspiciously, scornfully, badly...

 

7) Give indications on the actions and reactions of the characters:

Ex: "Come in !" John said

"No, I'd rather not.", Betty replied nervously. She started to turn around.

"Oh please, stay a while !" he asked. "Be nice..."

"Don't tell me what I must do ! Leave me alone !", she shouted furiously, slamming the door shut.

 

8) Use common or even familiar contracted forms: (but only between inverted commas)

- can't, I'm, there's, we'll, let's ...

- ain't ( am not ), gonna ( going to ), wanna ( want to), gotta ( got to ), gimme ( give me )

 

9) Use gap fillers:

- well, you know... you see... I mean... actually...

10. End your dialogue with a concluding sentence.

“Never” she shouted before she rushed out of the room leaving everybody speechless.

Other dialogue tags: (with their equivalent in French)

acknowledged

admitted

agreed

answered

argued

asked

barked

begged

bellowed

blustered

bragged

complained

confessed

cried

demanded

denied

giggled

hinted

hissed

howled

interrupted

laughed

        lied

        mumbled

Reconnaitre

Admettre

En convenir

Répondre

Se disputer- affirmer

demander

aboyer

supplier

Hurler-gueuler

Se vanter

Se vanter

Se plaindre

Pleura – se lamenta

Exiger

Glousser

Laisser entendre

Siffler

râler

marmonner

muttered

nagged

pleaded

promised

questioned

remembered

replied

requested

roared

sang

screamed

screeched

shouted

sighed

snarled

sobbed

threatened

warned

whimpered

whined

whispered

wondered

yelled

Marmonner

Rouspéter

Supplier-implorer

Demander - solliciter

Gronder

Chanter

Cri strident

Crier - hurler

Soupirer

Grogner

Sangloter

Menacer

Avertir

Gémir

Gémir- se lamenter

Murmurer

crier

...

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